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A Special Place for Blog Lovers with a Touch of Science!

An Introduction to Roland Barthes' Mythologies

Credit: French Philosopher Roland Barthes, 24th June 1975 (Photo by Sophie Bassouls/Sygma via Getty Images)

How to read capitalist mythology?

In the modern-day world, we are surrounded by images, symbols, brands, and advertisements of all sorts. We face them every day and everywhere. On the street, at home, in the shop, while surfing the web, literally, there is no place without ads and the meta-information hidden behind them. So how can we decipher what our new clothes, gadgets, books, or even thoughts represent? Roland Barthes, one of the most distinguished philosophers of the 20th century, concerned himself with such questions in his notable work Mythologies (1957). He develops an understanding of the mechanism that works behind the creation of symbols and myths in contemporary capitalist society.

Below you can watch a short video with an introduction to Roland Barthes' theory

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Editor’s Pick: Roland Barthes

Credit: French Philosopher Roland Barthes, Paris, 9th June 1978; Gettyimages

A Lover's Discourse: Fragments

"Am I in love? --yes, since I am waiting. The other one never waits. Sometimes I want to play the part of the one who doesn't wait; I try to busy myself elsewhere, to arrive late; but I always lose at this game. Whatever I do, I find myself there, with nothing to do, punctual, even ahead of time. The lover's fatal identity is precisely this: I am the one who waits."

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Quotes to reflect on: Roland Barthes

Photo credit: gettyimages.com

Language and Love

Roland Barthes is one of the most important think-tanks in Linguistics, Humanities, Literature, Cinema, and Post-Modern thought. As he perceived it, Language itself is the most crucial part of the body of our understanding of the world's phenomena. Language is not only a living organism but a corporeal part of our consciousness. We feel, touch, love, or hate, we fathom the depths of the Universe and experience our lives through our language. Our words and the meaning we attach to them have the possibility to literally create or disintegrate reality. So, don't underestimate what you daily utter or write or read or hear. It's what pushes up or down the evolution of our linguistic body, of our future as a species. Mind your words. For, what defines human being the most is language. And language could be love. Love and language - the greatest inventions of all times.

"Language is a skin: I rub my language against the other. It is as if I had words instead of fingers, or fingers at the tip of my words. My language trembles with desire. The emotion derives from a double contact: on the one hand, a whole activity of discourse discreetly, indirectly focuses upon a single signified, which is "I desire you," and releases, nourishes, ramifies it to the point of explosion (language experiences orgasm upon touching itself); on the other hand, I enwrap the other in my words, I caress, brush against, talk up this contact, I extend myself to make the commentary to which I submit the relation endure.

Roland Barthes, A Lover's Discourse: Fragments


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