A Special Place for Blog Lovers with a Touch of Science!

Janet MacFadyen
Bachelor's in geology from Brown University
M.F.A. from the University of Massachusetts/Amherst

Janet MacFadyen is the author of five works of poetry, with a sixth book, State of Grass, forthcoming from Salmon Poetry in 2023.

Her most recent book, Adrift in the House of Rocks, is an environmental collaboration with the...

Janet MacFadyen
Bachelor's in geology from Brown University
M.F.A. from the University of Massachusetts/Amherst

Janet MacFadyen is the author of five works of poetry, with a sixth book, State of Grass, forthcoming from Salmon Poetry in 2023.

Her most recent book, Adrift in the House of Rocks, is an environmental collaboration with the photographer Stephen Schmidt (New Feral Press 2019) focused on the landscape, geology, and political strife of southern Utah. The previous book, Waiting to Be Born (Dos Madres Press), drew both from a dune shack residency in the U.S. Cape Cod National Seashore coinciding with a powerful October nor'easter, and from travels to national parks across the United States.

Her work has appeared widely, from Scientific American, CALYX, Crannog, and Poetry Magazine, to online environmental journals such as Terrain: a Journal of the Natural and Built Environments and The Tiny Seed. Her poetry has been nominated for the Forward Prize and two Pushcarts; and anthologized in Honoring Nature: An Anthology of Authors and Artists Festival Writers.

She was a recipient of a 7-month fellowship at the Fine Arts Work Center in Provincetown, MA; and has held residencies at Cill Rialaig in County Kerry, Ireland, two dune shacks in Provincetown, MA, and Wellspring House in Ashfield, MA. She is currently the managing editor of the collaborative poetry publisher, Slate Roof Press.

Ms. MacFadyen's non-fiction writing has appeared in Natural New England; and her research has contributed to pieces in the Atlantic Monthly, Forbes FYI, AARP Magazine, and Lost Discoveries, a history of the non-Western roots of science published by Simon & Schuster.

Contact:
e: [email protected]


photo © Stephen Schmidt

"Since I have anthropomorphized nature in my poetry, let me take on the subject. I could say: that when nature is cast in human form, it makes the scientific processes undergirding it easier for most people to understand, more comforting for them to absorb, and so easier to love. And if we humans are moved to love, then we are often moved to protect and save — which would be a good thing in this time of environmental degradation.

But that implies a certain analytical process when first drafting poetry, and the analytical brain inevitably shackles any deep insights trying to arise against our previously held expectations. The truth is, I have always found it easier to talk to other creatures than to talk to people. Partly, I do this in the way older people and children talk to themselves, not really expecting an answer, and partly because I don't see much difference, really, between myself and the ants, or the white pines behind my house, or the onions in my cupboard. Nature is a good listener, whereas other people often are not. I try to return the favor and be a good observer of nature myself. It is possible, I find, to open up my pores to try to experience the fundamental natures of other inhabitants of our world."

by Janet MacFadyen

 

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Noam Chomsky
Laureate Professor of Linguistics at the University of Arizona

Avram Noam Chomsky is а Laureate Professor of Linguistics at the University of Arizona and Institute Professor Emeritus at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT).
He is renowned American linguist, cognitive scientist, philosopher, historian, social critic, and...

Noam Chomsky
Laureate Professor of Linguistics at the University of Arizona

Avram Noam Chomsky is а Laureate Professor of Linguistics at the University of Arizona and Institute Professor Emeritus at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT).
He is renowned American linguist, cognitive scientist, philosopher, historian, social critic, and political activist. Noam Chomsky is one of the most influential public intellectual in the world and a significant figure in analytic philosophy and one of the creators of the area of cognitive science. He is often dubbed "the father of modern linguistics". An author of more than 150 books on various topics as linguistics, philosophy, politics, climate, mass media and many more.

Contact:
web: http://www.chomsky.info


© Wikipedia.org/posted under CC BY-SA 4.0

In September 22, 2020 published as a co-author the book - Climate Crisis and the Global Green New Deal: The Political Economy of Saving the Planet

 

 

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Chantal Bilodeau
Playwright and translator
Interests: science, policy, art, and climate change

Chantal Bilodeau is playwright and translator whose work focuses on the intersection of science, policy, art, and climate change. In her capacity as Artistic Director of The Arctic Cycle, she has been instrumental in getting the theatre and educational...

Chantal Bilodeau
Playwright and translator
Interests: science, policy, art, and climate change

Chantal Bilodeau is playwright and translator whose work focuses on the intersection of science, policy, art, and climate change. In her capacity as Artistic Director of The Arctic Cycle, she has been instrumental in getting the theatre and educational communities, as well as diverse audiences in the U.S. and abroad, to engage in climate action through programming that includes live events, talks, publications, workshops, national and international convenings, and a worldwide distributed theatre festival.

Playwriting awards include the Woodward International Playwriting Prize as well as first prize in the Earth Matters on Stage Ecodrama Festival and in the Uprising National Playwriting Competition. Her plays and translations have been presented in over a dozen countries around the world.

In addition to curating HowlRound Theatre Commons’s only recurring blog series, Theatre in the Age of Climate Change, she has written on the same subject for “American Theatre Magazine”, the Center for Energy and Environmental Research in the Human Sciences, Future Earth, and the World Policy Institute, as well as contributed to several academic volumes including, most recently, “International Climate Protection” and “Extraordinary Partnerships: How the Arts and Humanities are Transforming Society”.

She is currently writing a series of eight plays that look at the social and environmental changes taking place in the eight Arctic states and, in 2019, was named one of “8 Trailblazers Who Are Changing the Climate Conversation” by Audubon Magazine

Contacts:
e: [email protected]  | www.cbilodeau.com


© Image credit: cbilodeau.com

"As a Québécois playwright raised in a minority culture and language, but now living in the U.S. and writing in English, I often find myself at crossroads – between languages, between cultures, between social classes. So I quite naturally take on the role of facilitator: I invite people who might not normally encounter each other to engage in meaningful conversation. I also feel passionate about using theatre to bring environmental and social justice issues into the public discourse; I believe artists can help define how we collectively shape our future. The creative and collaborative process makes us uniquely qualified to distill seemingly intractable problems down to human-size components. Given how polarized our society has become about the climate crisis and other social issues, narratives that can move us away from divisive politics and apocalyptic thinking, and toward compassionate listening, are urgently needed.

The rate of change in the Arctic is greater than anywhere else. Already, we are losing incredible riches, both natural and human, before we have learned to fully appreciate them. With the plays of The Arctic Cycle, I am trying to capture this moment in time, to acknowledge the transition, to bear witness to disruptions that are so massive that we will be struggling to comprehend them for years to come. Storytelling has always been humans’ way of understanding the world and themselves in it. Now that we are facing our biggest challenge yet, we need those stories to ground ourselves and propel us forward with an equal measure of purpose and compassion. "

Chantal Bilodeau

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Xavier Cortada
Professor of Practice: Artist at the University of Miami
Interests: Global Climate Change, Social Engagement, Environment


Xavier Cortada is Professor of Practice: Artist at the University of Miami as a faculty member of the Department of Art and Art History. He has exhibited his work in museums, galleries and cultural venues across...

Xavier Cortada
Professor of Practice: Artist at the University of Miami
Interests: Global Climate Change, Social Engagement, Environment


Xavier Cortada is Professor of Practice: Artist at the University of Miami as a faculty member of the Department of Art and Art History. He has exhibited his work in museums, galleries and cultural venues across the Americas, Europe, Africa and Antarctica—and locally at the Miami Art Museum, the Bass Museum of Art, the Miami Science Museum and the Historical Museum of Southern Florida.

Recent group shows include the Boulder Museum of Contemporary Art in Colorado (2007), the Nobel Peace Center in Oslo, Norway (2007), the BOZAR Center for Fine Arts in Brussells, Belgium (2007), and the Ministry of Culture in Monaco (2008). Please visit www.cortada.com/calendar.htm for details.

Cortada has created art for the White House, the World Bank, the Florida Supreme Court, and the Museum of Florida History. In his hometown, Cortada’s commissioned work hangs in City Hall, County Hall, and the facade of the Juvenile Courthouse.

Cortada has worked with groups across the world to produce numerous large-scale murals and community art projects, including: environmental installations on Miami Beach and the South Pole. International AIDS Conference murals in Switzerland and South Africa, peace murals in Northern Ireland and Cyprus, and child welfare murals in Panama and Bolivia.

In 2007, as a recipient of the National Science Foundation Antarctic Artists and Writers Program, he created site-specific installations at the South Pole. In June 2008, through the fiscal sponsorship of the New York Foundation for the Arts, Cortada will travel to the North Pole to install some of these pieces there.

Cortada holds three degrees from the University of Miami – a Bachelor of Arts, Master of Public Administration and Juris Doctor. The Cuban-American artist’s work and writings are preserved in the Xavier Cortada Collection of the University of Miami Libraries Cuban Heritage Collection.

Contacts:
e: [email protected] | www.cortada.com


© Image: Xavier [email protected] Basel
credit: cortada.com

"My work aims to challenge us to find deeper meaning in our present lives by exploring the paths of those who came before us and our relationship to the natural world.

In 2006, I created Absence of Place, a photo installation at the Miami Art Museum. In it 180 present-day images of absent Miami structures were printed on yellow-card stock and hung in plastic bags. On the wall, beneath each photo I wrote a caption of a memory generated at that site. I did so to give context to the new building at the site -- and to give the now absent building life in our collective memory.

Other pieces explore our ability to coexist with nature: In The Reclamation Project, I hung 252 mangrove seedlings (in plastic, water-filled cups) at the Bass Museum and worked with volunteers to place another 2500 across South Beach, `reclaiming` an island that once a lush coastal ecosystem thriving with mangroves.

A follow-up urban reforestation eco-art effort, Native Flags, is currently being implemented through the Miami Science Museum to re-grow Miami’s native tree canopy. Both challenge us to seek ways to coexist with the nature.

In January 2007, as a National Science Foundation Antarctic Artists and Writers Program grantee, I traveled to the South Pole to create site-specific installations about our interconnectedness to one other and our planet: In The Longitudinal Installation, I arranged 24 shoes in a circle around the South Pole as a proxy for those affected by global climate change in the world above.

In the 150,000-year Journey, I used a moving ice sheet to mark time: I planted a mangrove seedling at the South Pole, embedded in the ice it will ride for 150,000 years towards the water’s edge where, theoretically, it will set its roots. The piece addresses the travails of an immigrant's journey --- the displacement, the solitude, the struggle to simply integrate oneself into society. In a more universal way, the 150,000-year Journey, explores humankind as it evolves through time. It will take almost 150,000 years for this art piece to be completed. What will our world look like then? Juxtaposing Antarctica's geological time frames with human time frames (see The Markers, which uses flags to mark the movement of the ice sheet during the past 50 years, when humans first inhabited the South Pole), my art reaffirms the notion that we are simply custodians of the planet who should learn to live in harmony with nature. "

Prof. Xavier Cortada

 

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Oliver Kellhammer
Artist, writer, and researcher
Interests: Climate Change, Sustainability, Social Engagement

Oliver Kellhammer is an artist, writer, and researcher, who seeks, through his botanical interventions and social art practice, to demonstrate nature’s surprising ability to recover from damage. His work facilitates the processes of...

Oliver Kellhammer
Artist, writer, and researcher
Interests: Climate Change, Sustainability, Social Engagement

Oliver Kellhammer is an artist, writer, and researcher, who seeks, through his botanical interventions and social art practice, to demonstrate nature’s surprising ability to recover from damage. His work facilitates the processes of environmental regeneration by engaging the botanical and socio-political underpinnings of the landscape. It continues to evolve and has taken various forms such as small-scale urban eco-forestry, inner city community agriculture and the restoration of eroded railway ravines.

Recent work has focused on the psychosocial effects of climate change, decontaminating polluted soil, reintroducing prehistoric trees to landscapes impacted by industrial logging, and cataloging the biodiversity of brownfields. He is currently a lecturer in sustainable systems at Parsons in NYC.

He has lectured and given artists talks on bio-art, ecological design, urban ecology and permaculture at universities and cultural institutions throughout North America and abroad, including NYU, Rensselaer Polytechnic, OTIS College, University of Oregon, Emily Carr University, Smith College, University of British Columbia, Bainbridge Graduate Institute, University of Windsor, Aalto University (Finland) Tohoku University (Japan). He is based in New York's Alphabet City and rural British Columbia.

Contacts:
e: [email protected]  | http://www.oliverk.org


© oliverk.org

"I am interested in exploring the processes of ecological regeneration in the wake of human disturbance, either through passive field observation (what can I not do?) of biota recolonizing industrial wastelands or by actively engaging in the biological and socio-political processes that inform these landscapes by attempting to improve their relationships with each other. The latter approach often takes the form of what I call 'botanical interventions', whereby I employ horticultural techniques to mitigate problems between people and the landscape, enhancing both the sense of the place and its ecological carrying capacity, as well as addressing such problems as erosion, the availability of affordable and nutritious food and the frequent lack of agency low-income communities are allowed over the design of their urban spaces.

My past projects include a community access bio-materials plantation, the reforestation of an eroded railway ravine where the vegetation is now protected as intellectual property, and working with squatters in Canada’s poorest neighbourhood to establish the country’s first public permaculture food forest and Asian ethnobotanical arboretum.

My most recent investigations have focused on the speculative botany of climate change and the role of brownfield ecologies as refugia for biodiversity. My interventions, when I make them, are deliberately anti-monumental. As they integrate into the ecological and cultural communities that form around them, my role as the artist becomes increasingly obscured."

Oliver Kellhammer

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Michael Harrison
Composer and Pianist
Interests: Western classical and Indian classical music

Composer/pianist Michael Harrison (called “an American maverick” by Philip Glass) is one of only a few musicians with equal training and immersion in both Western classical and Indian classical music. His music forges a new approach to composition...

Michael Harrison
Composer and Pianist
Interests: Western classical and Indian classical music

Composer/pianist Michael Harrison (called “an American maverick” by Philip Glass) is one of only a few musicians with equal training and immersion in both Western classical and Indian classical music. His music forges a new approach to composition through tunings and structures that extend the ancient concept of just intonation, a form of pure tuning constructed from musical intervals of perfect mathematical proportions.

While still an undergraduate student, Harrison met composer La Monte Young. Soon Young brought him to New York as his protégé, to study composition, performance, and Indian classical music. Harrison was the exclusive tuner for Young’s custom Bösendorfer concert grand and became the only person other than the composer to perform Young’s 6-hour The Well-Tuned Piano. Terry Riley became a close friend and mentor. Most importantly, Harrison became a disciple of Young and Riley’s music guru Pandit Pran Nath, traveling to India with Pran Nath and Riley for periods of extensive study and practice.

Harrison creates dedicated tuning systems for many of his works. He also pioneered a structural approach to composition in which the proportions of harmonic relationships organically determine other musical elements such as pitch, duration, and dynamics. He seeks expressions of universality via the physics of sound – music that brings one into a state of concentrated listening as a meditative and even mind-altering experience.


His music has been performed at BAM’s Next Wave Festival, Carnegie Hall, Lincoln Center, the Muziekgebouw, Park Avenue Armory, the Metropolitan Museum of Art, MoMA, the Louvre, Centre Pompidou, MASS MoCA, Big Ears Festival, Spoleto Festival USA, the United Nations, Klavier Festival Ruhr, and the Sundance Film Festival.

A Guggenheim Fellow, Harrison has been commissioned by Grammy-winning vocal group Roomful of Teeth, Alarm Will Sound, Maya Beiser, Cello Octet Amsterdam, Del Sol String Quartet, and Contemporaneous. His evening-length work Revelation, for piano in his own tuning system, was named one of the Best Classical Recordings of 2007 by The New York Times, Boston Globe, and TimeOut New York, and was called “probably the most brilliant and original extended composition for solo piano since the early works of Frederic Rzewski three decades ago” by Pulitzer Prize-winning critic Tim Page. Other acclaimed works include his Time Loops album with Maya Beiser (selected for NPR’s Top 10 Classical Albums of 2012) and Just Constellations for Roomful of Teeth, forthcoming from New Amsterdam (called “glacially beautiful” and “luminous” by Alex Ross in The New Yorker).

His residencies include MacDowell, Yaddo, Camargo, McColl Center, Ucross, Djerassi, Millay, Bogliasco, La Napoule, I-Park, MASS MoCA, and the Visiting Artists program of the American Academy in Rome. In addition to the Guggenheim, his awards include a NYSCA/NYFA Fellowship, Aaron Copland Recording Grant, Classical Recording Foundation Award, IBLA Foundation Prize, American Composers Forum residency and performance in the Havana School of Music. He invented the "harmonic piano," a grand piano that plays 24 notes per Contemporary Music Festival, and a New Music USA Grant.

Harrison received his Masters in Composition, studying with Reiko Fueting, at Manhattan octave, documented in the Grove Dictionary of Musical Instruments. His music has been recorded on Cantaloupe, New Amsterdam, Innova, New Albion, and New World Records.

Contacts:
For booking and PR: contact Peter Robles
[email protected]
www.seriousmusicmedia.com
Phone: (267) 474-1756
Youtube: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCwsdXje6PBl4tME4IZeg-cA


© credit: myemail.constantcontact.com

"My initial fascination with pure tunings stems from my interest in North Indian classical music, which I began singing and studying in 1978 with one of India’s master vocalists, Pandit Pran Nath, and his earliest American disciples, La Monte Young and Terry Riley. Singing Indian ragas while accompanying myself on the tamboura, a resonant Indian string instrument, awakened my ears to the beautiful resonances of pure tunings. As I became more familiar with the intonation of the Indian ragas, the compromises of equal temperament sounded increasingly “out of tune” and became disturbing to my newly sensitive hearing. As I began exploring the application of just intonation to the piano these two musical worlds came together for me and opened the door to a new musical universe latent with potentials waiting to be discovered. The “harmonically tuned” piano is my modern microtonal approach to the ancient principles of just intonation tuning based on non-tempered harmonic resonances or overtones. The foundation for this work was laid by Pythagoras and other Greek philosophers and mathematicians who worked out a theory of whole numbers as they relate to musical consonances. This concept of universal order links music, mathematics, architecture, and philosophy in a system of balance and proportion that was referred to as “the music of the spheres.” Just intonation is found not only in the music of ancient Greece, but also in that of India, Persia, China, and Japan, and the “a cappella” music of the West. I strongly believe that in the generations and centuries to come hundreds and thousands of composers will explore new tunings at the piano, and that the instrument itself will be redesigned to accommodate this revolutionary new approach. Tuners will also learn these new tunings. But the composers need to be the sound explorers that lead the way—then the instrument makers, tuners, and performers will follow. "

by Michael Harrison

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Edric Choo Poo Liang, Architect
Director & Principal
O2 Design Atelier Sdn Bhd

Born in 1976, Edric Choo Poo obtained his B. Arch from University of Malaya and B.Sc. Housing Building & Planning from University Science of Malaysia. He has traveled around the world including, China, Japan, India, America, France, Finland, England, and Germany. He...

Edric Choo Poo Liang, Architect
Director & Principal
O2 Design Atelier Sdn Bhd

Born in 1976, Edric Choo Poo obtained his B. Arch from University of Malaya and B.Sc. Housing Building & Planning from University Science of Malaysia. He has traveled around the world including, China, Japan, India, America, France, Finland, England, and Germany. He started his architecture career under a few renowned architecture firms including TR Hamzah & Yeang, ZLG Design, RT+Q, W Architects, SCDA, and WOHA.

He is the founder and director of O2 Design Atelier (O2DA). The studio is based on the model of creative industries. O2DA’s works are not restricted to a specific style but rather responds to the nature of the projects, contexts, local culture, social behavior and formal architecture language. We believe climate change is a very important issue. Each project is the result of a meticulous, in-depth design process rather than a preconception of an end result.

O2DA explores integrated designs for the built environment, moving between master planning, architecture, interior, landscape, and furniture design.

Contacts:
T: 03-7887 7228 / 03-7886 1448   
E: [email protected]; [email protected]
W: www.o2designatelier.com
F: https://www.facebook.com/o2DesignAtelier


© photo provided by the individual

"For me, good architecture responds to the project brief and space requirement, site, context, function, culture and the user. It must be sustainable and environmentally responsive.

My work is always in touch with nature, light and spatial experience, as well as the relationship between space and form.

I believe architecture is a balance between art and science that goes in harmony with the site. Also, I’m always in search of and developing new architecture language, taking into account the past and local culture."

Arch. Edric Choo Poo Liang

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Howard Gardner
Hobbs Research Professor of Cognition and Education
HARVARD GRADUATE SCHOOL OF EDUCATION


Howard Gardner is the Hobbs Research Professor of Cognition and Education at the Harvard Graduate School of Education.

He has studied and written extensively about intelligence, creativity, leadership, and professional ethics, and is...

Howard Gardner
Hobbs Research Professor of Cognition and Education
HARVARD GRADUATE SCHOOL OF EDUCATION


Howard Gardner is the Hobbs Research Professor of Cognition and Education at the Harvard Graduate School of Education.

He has studied and written extensively about intelligence, creativity, leadership, and professional ethics, and is co-founder of The Good Project. Among his current research undertakings is a national investigation of liberal arts and sciences in the United States in the 21st century.

In September 2020, MIT Press published his intellectual memoir A Synthesizing Mind, www.asynthesizingmind.com

Contacts:
e: [email protected] | t: 617-496-4929 | f: 617-496-4855   
www.howardgardner.com | www.thegoodproject.org | www.multipleintelligencesoasis.org


© Harvard Graduate School of Education

"I have always been a supporter of the values of the 18th century Enlightenment, though I wish that the Enlightenment reflected values of the whole civilized world, not just Western Europe.  The events of recent years-- in the United States but also in many other parts of the world-- have alarmed me.  
I wonder whether the world is ready to find out what is true and what is not, and whether we can have shared views about the kind of planet on which we are fated to live. And that is why our work-- the work of my colleagues and me at Project Zero-- has focused sharply on moral and ethics--- how to decide what is right, and what is wrong, to put forth our views honestly and be prepared to discuss and defend them. See www.thegoodproject.org for more information."

Prof. Howard Gardner

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