A Special Place for Blog Lovers with a Touch of Science!

Found in space: Complex carbon-based molecules

Photo credit: NSF/Glen Langston

Discovery may offer clues to carbon's role in planet and star formation

Much of the carbon in space is believed to exist in the form of large molecules called polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons or PAHs. Since the 1980s, evidence has indicated that these molecules are abundant in space, but they have not been directly observed. Now, a team of U.S. National Science Foundation-funded researchers led by Massachusetts Institute of Technology scientist Brett McGuire has identified two distinctive PAHs in a patch of space called the Taurus Molecular Cloud.

Continue reading
  456 Hits
  0 Comments
456 Hits
0 Comments

Scientists image magnetic fields at the edge of M87's black hole

Photo credit: EHT collaboration

Event Horizon Telescope reveals a new view of the M87 galaxy's center

Event Horizon Telescope scientists, who produced the first image of a black hole, have revealed a new view of the massive object at the center of the M87 galaxy, showing how it looks in polarized light.


Continue reading
  584 Hits
  0 Comments
584 Hits
0 Comments

Mars rovers safe from lightning strikes

Photo credit: Credit: NASA, ESA, The Hubble Heritage Team (STScI/AURA), J. Bell (Cornell University) and M. Wolff (Space Science Institute)

Sparks triggered by friction under normal atmospheric conditions would likely be small

If experiments done in small bottles in a University of Oregon lab are accurate, the friction of colliding Martian dust particles is unlikely to generate big electrical storms or threaten newly arrived exploration vehicles or, eventually, human visitors, according to U.S. National Science Foundation-funded researchers.


Continue reading
  415 Hits
  0 Comments
Tags:
415 Hits
0 Comments

Could that be our first contact with extraterrestrial technology?

Image credit: NASA / ESA / Hubble / ESO / M. Kornmesser.

"1I/2017 U1 'Oumuamua" — the first known interstellar object within the Solar System

In October 2017, a vague point of light was detected by the Pan-STARRS 1 telescope in Hawaii. At first, it looked like a typical small asteroid, but later observations made it possible for astronomers to figure its orbit more accurately. It turns out that it didn't match the behavior of any other asteroid or meteor observed so far. The enigmatic stranger, which was called 'Oumuamua flew past the sun, coming from 'above' the plane of the planets on a highly inclined orbit, with speed fast enough to escape the Sun's gravitational pull and eventually head out of our Solar System, speeding up.

Initially, it was assumed that the object is an interstellar comet since they are thought to be more numerous than interstellar asteroids. The problem was that there wasn't any trace of the typical hallmarks of cometary activity – no evidence of gas emission or dust. Therefore, there is no clue how does it change the anticipated trajectory of its orbit and why does it accelerate its speed.

Continue reading
  351 Hits
  0 Comments
351 Hits
0 Comments