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When Science meets Art: Quadrature

Credit: Quadrature.co ; Ars Electronica

The Age of Multidisciplinarity

Often, we tend to separate Science and Art in an ungrounded categorical way as they are two disparate fields of human activities. Science is seen as objective, explanatory, rational, practical, and unconditional truth, whereas Art - as a whimsical, irrational, imaginary representation of the so-called "real world." Well, first of all, both Science and Art have been proven adequate or inadequate to reality. Experimentation is part of the process. And second, thinking that way, we exclude some crucial similarities that unite them like creativeness and imagination. All scientific and technological achievements were at one point just ideas in the mind of someone. As Albert Einstein once said, "the greatest scientists are artists as well."Yes, these are two different ways to understand, interpret, represent, and literally, perceive the cosmos around us, sometimes opposite to each other. But instead of seeking their contrasts, we could see how they work together. The more perspectives we consider, the better comprehension of the world we achieve. 

The fact that Art and Science are two different approaches towards the natural world does not cut the connection between them. Conversely, they enrich and enhance each other. We live in unprecedented ages of informational interconnection and easy access to thousands of areas of knowledge and technology. Each discipline has reached striking depths of its subject matter, and now is the time to combine them, to explore their possible and impossible interactions.

Today, we present you with a good example of such interdisciplinary and multimedia artistic experiments – Quadrature.

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"Galapagos in C" - a Unique Symbiosis between Architecture & Music

Image: ALN

IT IS ALL ABOUT ART 

What happens when you mix the enthusiasm of 40 students in architecture at Rhode Island School of Design (RISD), the canonical musical piece form 1964  "in C" by Terry Riley, the unique architectural improvisations by David Gersten, the unprecedent  musical talent of the pianist and composer Michael Harrison, and the remarkable piano skills of another pianist and composer -  Stuart Isacoff? The answers is simple. A masterpiece called "Galapagos in C". 

The performance was part of two collaborative Architecture studios co-taught by Gersten and Harrison. Gersten led the class "Galapagos Providence" and Harrison led the class "Outside the Guidelines". "In a series of call and response duets, listening and speaking to the paintings within the RISD Museum's Grand Gallery, the work attempts to create a conversation with the room, drawing out the paintings into the sounds of 'In C' using spoken word, sound installations, performative gestures and projections," Michael Harrison say, while explicating the idea behind the project. 

The performance was featured in "The Wall Street Journal".



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Prof. Una Chaudhuri: Animals Show Us How Much We Still Need to Know, Not Only about Them but Also about Ourselves

image: pixabay.com

OUR BEST FRIENDS. AND OUR BEST TEACHERS

Prof. Una Chaudhuri talks about the book on animal studies and performance - "Animal Acts: Performing Species Today", published by University of Michigan Press. But Prof. Chaudhuri does not talk only about the book. Nor does she talk only about animals and their place in contemporary performance. What she talks about is how we think about animals, about ourselves and about the world we share. About the way animals are trying to create a connection, and the way we, humans, are trying to distort it. She talks about animals. But she actually talks about us…

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