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Thoughts to reflect on

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Who said that a small group of people is not capable to change the world?

"Never doubt that a small group of thoughtful, committed, citizens can change the world. Indeed, it is the only thing that ever has."
― Margaret Mead


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Thoughts to reflect on

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Oscar Wilde


"Life is one fool thing after another whereas love is two fool things after each other."


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Thoughts to reflect on

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Ursula K. Le Guin

"To oppose something is to maintain it... You must go somewhere else; you must have another goal; then you walk a different road."


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Inspirational Quotes

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Henry Miller

"Life moves on, whether we act as cowards or heroes. Life has no other discipline to impose, if we would but realize it, than to accept life unquestioningly. Everything we shut our eyes to, everything we run away from, everything we deny, denigrate or despise, serves to defeat us in the end. What seems nasty, painful, evil, can become a source of beauty, joy, and strength, if faced with an open mind. Every moment is a golden one for him who has the vision to recognize it as such"
― Henry Miller


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As the poet says

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Robert Frost

The Road Not Taken

Two roads diverged in a yellow wood,
And sorry I could not travel both
And be one traveler, long I stood
And looked down one as far as I could
To where it bent in the undergrowth;

Then took the other, as just as fair,
And having perhaps the better claim,
Because it was grassy and wanted wear;
Though as for that the passing there
Had worn them really about the same,

And both that morning equally lay
In leaves no step had trodden black.
Oh, I kept the first for another day!
Yet knowing how way leads on to way,
I doubted if I should ever come back.

I shall be telling this with a sigh
Somewhere ages and ages hence:
Two roads diverged in a wood, and I—
I took the one less traveled by,
And that has made all the difference.

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What does the poet say?

Photo credit: American poet Walt Whitman. This image was made in 1887 in New York, by photographer George C. Cox.; by Wikipedia

Walt Whitman

...All truths wait in all things,
They neither hasten their own delivery nor resist it,
They do not need the obstetric forceps of the surgeon,
The insignificant is as big to me as any,
(What is less or more than a touch?)

Logic and sermons never convince,
The damp of the night drives deeper into my soul.
(Only what proves itself to every man and woman is so,
Only what nobody denies is so.)...
Walt Whitman, Song of Myself

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Sunday Brainy Quotes

Portrait of Blaise Pascal; Image credit: gettyimages.com

Blaise Pascal

Blaise Pascal (19 June 1623 – 19 August 1662) was one of the most distinguished French polymaths of early Modern Times. He was a child prodigy. Pascal's earliest works date from the time he was just 16 years old. He made important contributions in mathematics and physics. A great inventor, he constructed one of the firsts mechanical calculators. In his later life, he became a Catholic theologian, philosopher, and writer demonstrating a well-elaborated and refined writing style. His last and unfinished work - Thought (Pensées) – a collection of fragments, is a delicate and yet incredibly powerful illustration of his concise and aphoristic genius.

Below you can enjoy and muse upon seven quotes by the French master of eloquence:

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Sunday Brainy Quotes: Oscar Wilde

Oscar Wilde in 1882; via Wikipedia
Egoism vs Egotism vs Egocentrism

There is a widely spread misunderstanding of these three terms. Often they are used interchangeably thus a negative shadow has been cast over all of them. Egocentrism is a childish (nevertheless it could frequently be observed in adults behavior) state of mind in which one is unable to accurately assume or understand an opinion or perspective different from one's own; egotism is defined as the drive or tendency to overestimate one's own personality, qualities, and values; whereas egoism stands for the philosophical presumption of the profound importance of individualism usually opposed to the moral censure of self-interest supported by the more conservative and dogmatic parts of society. Therefore, the first and the second are somehow deviations from the clear perception of one's own place in the world, while the third is the acceptance of the personal rights that each individual embody. In that regard, egoism is to principally base your convictions on the belief that the most genuine and true source of knowledge for one is the individual's experience of world phenomena.

Of course, preoccupation exceptionally with one's own personality and beliefs could end up in egocentric or egotistic behavior. However, egoism is a precondition for, on the one hand, the recognition of the Other as an individual and thus as someone worthy of consideration, and on the other hand, for the inner drive for personal development and improvement. After all, the best that one could give to the world is his unique point of view and talents. Or, as Oscar Wilde might say – playing someone else role is boring, better play yourself!

"Be yourself; everyone else is already taken."

― Oscar Wilde


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Thoughts to reflect on: Hermann Hesse

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The Steppenwolf

Called "the last romanticist", Hermann Hesse (2 July 1877 – 9 August 1962 ) made a major impact on 20th-century western literature and culture. Hesse inspired authors like Thomas Mann, Sam Shepard, Colin Wilson, and Timothy Leary, the composer Richard Strauss, the musician Carlos Santana and many more. In 1946, he received the Nobel Prize, of which he wasn't really enthusiastic, though. His works reflect upon the nature of the self, the search for meaning and authenticity, the complicated relation between the individual and the others, and the enigmatic nature of collective archetypes and unconsciousness. The German-Swiss writer was a true traveler in the universe inside us. A few people in the history of literature possessed such eloquence and abilities to represent so genuinely the depth of the inner world, emotions, and dreams of their characters. Hesse's studies of Eastern knowledge became a significant inspiration and theme in his novels, some of which are considered as the most refined and "true translations" of Eastern wisdom into the terms of Western culture. There was something of a cult of Hermann Hesse's "Magical theater" of the self. Rock bands, artists, and writers, part of the 60's counter-culture partly embraced his visionary and imaginative narratives, evidently without his approval or identification with any of them. Hermann Hesse has lived, especially in his late ages, a peculiarly secluded life. Notoriously, in front of his door in Switzerland, there was a sign saying "No Visitors".

Probably his most-known books are Demian, Steppenwolf, Siddhartha, and The Glass Bead Game. All of them enacting the psychological inner dramaturgy of the individual. Hermann Hesse's stories embody the timeless existential journey of one towards his destiny and mission in this world. He became one of the finest voices of the human condition, soul, and personality.

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Thoughts to reflect on: T.S.Eliot

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The Rock

In 1934, T. S. Eliot, arguably the most prominent modernist poet, produced a play – The Rock – characterized by great allegorical, historical, and metaphysical complexity and eclecticism. Some of his most graceful religious poems derived from that text. Matter of fact, the project was part of a fund-raising contest for the collection of money for the construction of forty-five new churches. The interwar years were marked by considerable disillusionment of Christian morality and religious belief in general. The Diocese in London was worried that there is a decrease in worshiping communities in the suburbs and decided to issue an appeal for public funding. T. S. Eliot participated with his play and thus helped for the collection of at least 1,500 pounds, which would be around 107,308.0 pounds in today's currencies.

Later, the Choruses from the Rock were published as part of T. S. Eliot Collected Poems, 1909 – 1962.

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