A Special Place for Blog Lovers with a Touch of Science!

What is Humanism?

Image credit:  Leonardo da Vinci's Vitruvian Man (c. 1490) shows the correlations of ideal human body proportions with geometry described by the ancient Roman architect Vitruvius in his De Architectura. Vitruvius described the human figure as being like the principal source of proportion among the Classical orders of architecture. Via Wikipedia

The idea of Humanism

The words humanism, humanist, humane are so widely present and taken for granted in both scholarly and everyday talk that whenever someone is trying to explain what these actually mean, he should recount one very old and long tale. A tale of great and noble ideas that many times revolutionized the way we perceive our human world and considerably increased the extent to which we fathom the depths of the Universe within and without us. But what exactly is humanism? Where does that idea come from? How did it affect us throughout human history and what is humanism today?

Continue reading
  203 Hits
  0 Comments
203 Hits
0 Comments

Thoughts to reflect on: I think, therefore I am

Image Credit: gettyimages.com

Rene Descartes

Arguably, the most famous philosophical quote ever – I think, therefore I am (cogito ergo sum), which is considered to be the foundation of the Modern Philosophy and thought, belongs to the French philosopher Rene Descartes (31 March 1596 – 11 February 1650). Renatus Cartesius (his Latinized name) was as well a prominent and influential mathematician and scientist, who is the founder of the Cartesian coordinate system, praised as the first systematic bridge between geometry and algebra.

Continue reading
  259 Hits
  0 Comments
259 Hits
0 Comments

The genius of the Florentine Early Renaissance

Image Credit: Probable self-portrait of Botticelli, in his Adoration of the Magi (1475) via Wikipedia

Sandro Botticelli

Alessandro di Mariano di Vanni Filipepi (c. 1445 – May 17, 1510), who is widely known as Sandro Botticelli, was an Early Renaissance Italian painter. He was part of the Medici's court artistic group and was highly regarded among his contemporaries but later his work was forgotten until the 19th century. The Pre-Raphaelites rediscovered him and since then his pictures are praised as some of the most important forerunners of the High Renaissance. As opposed to the voluminous, sculpture-like style of latter artists like Michelangelo or Raphael, he put the accent on the linear grace of the personages represented.


Continue reading
  208 Hits
  0 Comments
208 Hits
0 Comments

The poetry of Janet MacFadyen - where Science meets Art

photo © by Stephen Schmidt

When Science meets Art

Scientific and artistic activities have had a long and incredibly complicated, we could say "love-hate" relationship throughout human history. From time to time, they were promoting and enhancing each other, whereupon an epoch of mutual criticism and condemnation followed. Nowadays, most people imagine Science and Art somehow separately, as two distinct and incompatible essences of the human mind. As though one is dealing with the objective reality and the other with an amalgam of material world and imagination, hence the former have to be superior in reasoning to the latter. Now, that would be the case if we take the presumption that the physical world is somehow dead or could be taken out of the ceaseless motion of the Universe to be examined as an object. However, Nature is alive and in constant interaction with all of its inhabitants. 

We could speculate that the negligence towards the living character of Nature was indeed one of the main reasons we ended up with a climate crisis. Nevertheless, with the emergence of climate and environmental issues, a new vision appeared, or maybe an ancient one manifests once again. There are tendencies among various scientists and artists, in which both perspectives reconcile and bear new forms of perception towards Nature – more like a dialogue instead of research.

Janet MacFadyen – an American poet and scientific researcher – is one of the many who feels the need to change our attitude towards, and concepts of, natural phenomena. She gracefully expresses that feeling. MacFadyen transforms scientific perception into vivid poetic imagery that invokes deep insights into Nature and our connection with it. Her poems transmogrify hills and rocky formations into cities, stones and crystals into ancient teachers, rivers and brooks into the circulatory system of our living and breathing Mother Earth.

Below you can enjoy and reflect upon Janet MacFadyen's statement and meditative poetry!
Continue reading
  453 Hits
  0 Comments
453 Hits
0 Comments

On this date, 543 years ago...

Portrait by Hans Holbein, the younger (1527)

Sir Thomas More was born on February 7, 1478

Sir Thomas More (born February 7, 1478, London, England—died July 6, 1535, London) is the most renowned English Humanist of the Renaissance epoch. Aside from being famous for his literary work - Utopia, he was an influential statesman, chancellor of England, thinker, and a great representative of Christian rhetoric. Eventually, Thomas Moore was tragically sentenced to death and beheaded for repudiating the oath, which had to admit King Henry VIII as the head of the Church of England. On May 19, 1935, he is canonized as a saint by the Roman Catholic Church.


Continue reading
  231 Hits
  0 Comments
231 Hits
0 Comments