A Special Place for Blog Lovers with a Touch of Science!

When Bunnies Don't Lay Eggs

Image credit: BBC

Lesser-Known Easter Traditions From Around the World

Easter is just around the corner for the Catholic and Protestant world and coming soon for the Orthodox. The Easter bunny and the colorful eggs are probably the most widespread symbols of the holiday. But all around the world, there are different customs, which people adopted in order to celebrate the most important holiday in the Christian calendar. Let's take a look at some of them!
Continue reading
  386 Hits
  0 Comments
386 Hits
0 Comments

The Father of Modern Sculpture

Image credit: Portrait of Auguste Rodin, John Singer Sargent, 1884; Wikipedia

Auguste Rodin

The French sculptor François Auguste René Rodin (12 November 1840 – 17 November 1917) is considered the founder of modern sculpture as we know it today. He is one of the most famous artists both in the visual arts and intellectual worlds. Although he took classic sculpture education his first notable work Man with the Broken Nose (1863-4) was already a major deviation from the traditional view of the French Salon and caused great controversy and dispute. Rodin is highly appreciated as one of the most talented masters of both clay and bronze figures who demonstrated a unique and original model of these materials with complex forms, elaborated contrast of concavity and convexity, and a deep understanding of the play of lights and reflections.

His Art provoked a lot of discourses among the traditionalist. On the one hand, Rodin was a meticulous craftsman who was able to produce detailed precise rendering and on the other hand, he refused to follow the pieces of advice of the Salon and developed a new "classic" that cut off the threads of the dogmatic traditional views on sculpture. As opposed to the seeking of perfection, balance, completeness, and amplified beauty, the sculptor was now emphasizing the inner expressiveness of the subject matter, of the material itself, as well as the aesthetics of the ugliness, incompleteness, fragmentation, and naturalism. In his book Art: Conversations with Paul Gsell, he goes even furthermore saying that often the uglier something appears in Nature, the more beautiful it could be in the form of Art. Rodin abandoned the traditional use of mythology and allegories to convey the inner meanings of the represented subject and put the accent on the physicality and the individual unique features. He wasn't only an artist but a great thinker, who produced seminal writings on aesthetics and kept communication with some of the most influential intellectuals of his time.

Continue reading
  479 Hits
  0 Comments
479 Hits
0 Comments

Launch of “How We Thrive,” a collaborative message mural

Image credit: Cortada.com


April 10 - April 17

Miami-Dade County is brimming with vibrant cultures, people, and ideas. As an interconnected community, we call on those we elect to deliver a shared future that brings us the protection, happiness, and stability that allows us to fulfill our destinies. While our leaders have the responsibility to listen, we have the obligation to voice our concerns, hopes, and aspirations.


Continue reading
  691 Hits
  0 Comments
691 Hits
0 Comments

The Florentine Walls of Michelangelo - Because David is Too Mainstream

Image credit: Brooklyn Street Art

The Un-Ordinary Art of Michelangelo

We have all heard about David, Pieta, and the Sistine Chapel. Or maybe not all. If you have lived all your life in a cave in the vicinity of an isolated village, where the only electricity around is from the lightnings during a storm, you probably haven't. But then you wouldn't be reading this and would just have the feeling, that you are missing something out. What not many of us have heard about, are two places in Florence, where the Renaissance genius has left his mark in a rather unusual way. This is what we are going to explore today.

Continue reading
  506 Hits
  0 Comments
506 Hits
0 Comments

What is Romanticism?

Image credit: Théodore Géricault, The Raft of the Medusa, 1819; Wikipedia

A short introduction to Romanticism

We have all heard the words romantic, romance, Romanticism and we have all used them. But what actually they mean, and where do they come from? Do they necessarily refer to some mawkish and sentimental story, or there is something more? If you try to search on the web for information about it, you could spend hours reading tons of it and if you are really keen to know about it go for it. However, it isn't such a bad idea to get a bit more familiar with the subject matter before you invest your time in vast research. What you will find here is a brief but useful explanation of the 19th-century movement with a touch of subjectivity. Just like a romantic author would do. The rest is up to you!


Continue reading
  490 Hits
  0 Comments
490 Hits
0 Comments