A Special Place for Blog Lovers with a Touch of Science!

Enjoy our special posts in the fields of Earth & Planetary Sciences (EPS Blog) and Social Sciences & Arts (SSA Blog)

A Special Place for Blog Lovers with a Touch of Science!

Blog of Earth & Planetary Sciences EPS blog is specially made for Natural Science enthusiasts. Here you can discuss the most relevant themes of today’s scientific world with scientists from all around the world. Our goal is to facilitate the conversation between both scholars and amateurs by providing an online platform, which covers all the...

Blog of Earth & Planetary Sciences EPS blog is specially made for Natural Science enthusiasts. Here you can discuss the most relevant themes of today’s scientific world with scientists from all around the world. Our goal is to facilitate the conversation between both scholars and amateurs by providing an online platform, which covers all the main branches of Earth and Planetary Sciences like Geology, Informatics, Ecology, Space Technologies and, last but not the least, Educational methods and systems.

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Largest potentially hazardous asteroid detected in 8 years

Credit: Getty images

Twilight observations spot 3 large near-Earth objects lurking in the inner solar system

Twilight observations with the Dark Energy Camera at the Cerro Tololo Inter-American Observatory in Chile, a program of the U.S. National Science Foundation-supported NOIRLab, have enabled astronomers to spot three near-Earth asteroids, or NEAs, hiding in the glare of the sun. One is the largest object potentially hazardous to Earth to be discovered in the last eight years. The NEAs are part of an elusive population that lurks inside the orbits of Earth and Venus.

This is a notoriously challenging region for observations because asteroid hunters must contend with the glare of the sun. By taking advantage of the brief yet favorable observing conditions during twilight, however, the astronomers found an elusive trio of NEAs. The results are reported in The Astronomical Journal.

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Volcano's special 'voice' is key to understanding the linguistics of volcanoes

Credit: Etna Eruption 2022: Getty images

Tune changed in hours leading up to a kilometer-high lava fountain

Mount Etna, Italy: one of the most active volcanoes in the world. For Boise State University geoscientist Jeffrey Johnson, this volcano's special "voice" is proving key to understanding the linguistics of volcanoes.

Johnson and collaborators studied inaudible infrasound at Mount Etna and identified an infrasonic signal from the volcano, the tune of which changed in the hours leading up to a kilometer-high lava fountain, lasting hours.

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New measurements quantifying qudits provide glimpse of quantum future

Credit: Getty images

Researchers develop method for measuring qudits encoded in quantum frequency combs

Using existing experimental and computational resources, a multi-institutional team has developed an effective method for measuring high-dimensional qudits encoded in quantum frequency combs, a type of photon source, on a single optical chip.

Although the word "qudit" might look like a typo, this lesser-known cousin of the qubit, or quantum bit, can carry more information and is more resistant to noise — key qualities needed to improve the performance of quantum networks, quantum key distribution systems and, eventually, the quantum internet.

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Potential first traces of the universe's earliest stars uncovered

Credit: Getty images

Distant quasar provides evidence of first-generation star that died in 'super-supernova' explosion

Astronomers may have discovered the ancient chemical remains of the first stars to light up the universe. Using an analysis of a distant quasar observed by the 8.1-meter Gemini North Telescope, located on Hawaii, the scientists found an unusual ratio of elements that, they argue, could come only from the debris produced by the all-consuming explosion of a 300-solar-mass first-generation star. The work was supported by the U.S. National Science Foundation. Gemini North is operated by NSF's NOIRLab. The very first stars likely formed when the universe was only 100 million years old, less than 1% of its current age. These first stars were so massive that, when they ended their lives as supernovae, they tore themselves apart and seeded interstellar space with a distinctive blend of heavy elements.

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The 22nd edition of the SGEM Vienna Green conference

Credit: sgemviennagreen.org

XXII SGEM GeoConference – "Green Sciences for Green Life" Sessions

The host of this Green event is the Greenest City in the EU itself - Vienna city. Get ready to be amazed by the festive beauty of the Schönbrunn Palace, during the magical Christmas time (6th – 9th of December 2022). You want to be there already! Do you? Assure your place by submitting an article for an Oral or Poster presentation, or conveying a Workshop session on an up-to-date research topic. All participation forms are arranged with one idea - to touch the amazing synergy of green and live sciences, to present your high-quality work, to collaborate with other researchers, to listen to articles from distinguished scientists, and to share your experience. We are inspired to create a multidisciplinary platform where all the branches of science could co-operate and, in that manner, achieve the highest results.

"Some of the big challenges that we face, both societal and scientific, are just not solvable by people sitting in their single-discipline silos – bringing those disciplines together in the long term is what provides the big, big breakthroughs…" says Kedar Pandya of the Engineering and Physical Research Council (EPSRC). This is the power of interdisciplinarity - more effectively 'joining up' the contributions of different disciplines.

For more details about the conference, you can visit the SGEM Vienna Green Conference's website.

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Earth & Planetary Sciences (EPS)
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