A Special Place for Blog Lovers with a Touch of Science!

Enjoy our special posts in the fields of Earth & Planetary Sciences (EPS Blog) and Social Sciences & Arts (SSA Blog)

A Special Place for Blog Lovers with a Touch of Science!

Blog of Earth & Planetary Sciences EPS blog is specially made for Natural Science enthusiasts. Here you can discuss the most relevant themes of today’s scientific world with scientists from all around the world. Our goal is to facilitate the conversation between both scholars and amateurs by providing an online platform, which covers all the...

Blog of Earth & Planetary Sciences EPS blog is specially made for Natural Science enthusiasts. Here you can discuss the most relevant themes of today’s scientific world with scientists from all around the world. Our goal is to facilitate the conversation between both scholars and amateurs by providing an online platform, which covers all the main branches of Earth and Planetary Sciences like Geology, Informatics, Ecology, Space Technologies and, last but not the least, Educational methods and systems.

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Editor’s pick: Richard Feynman

Credit: Nobel Prize winning physicist Richard Feynman stands in front of a blackboard strewn with notation in his lab in Los Angeles, Californina. (Photo by Kevin Fleming/Corbis via Getty Images)

Excerpts from Feynman's book - QED: The Strange Theory of Light and Matter (1985)

1. "We cannot predict whether a given photon will arrive at A or B. All we can predict is that out of 100 photons that come down, an average of 4 will be reflected by the front surface. Does this mean that physics, a science of great exactitude, has been reduced to calculating only the probability of an event, and not predicting exactly what will happen? Yes. That's a retreat, but that's the way it is: Nature permits us to calculate only probabilities. Yet science has not collapsed."

2. "With quantum physics, who needs drugs?"

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Encrypted, one-touch, human-machine interface technology unveils user physiology

Credit: UCLA/Interconnected & Integrated Bioelectronics Lab

An advance may help prevent DUIs by detecting blood alcohol and drug levels prior to vehicle activation

Researchers at UCLA and Stanford University have developed a secure, noninvasive, one-touch technology using hydrogel-coated chemical sensors and a signal-interpretation framework. It can present detailed information about an individual's blood composition — such as metabolites, hormones, nutrients, and pharmaceuticals, as well as blood oxygen — all through the press of a finger.

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Friday Science Jokes

Credit: Getty images

Science is fun

After a long summer break, Friday Science Jokes is back at your service. Even during the hot holidays some of us were working hard and we all know that science could be a hard thing to do. No matter if you are still learning, teaching, or conducting research and experiments, you should never forget the creative power of a good laugh. Thank goodness science lends itself to some pretty good jokes. Below you can enjoy some of them.

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Subsurface water on Mars defies expectations

Credit: Getty images

Physics connects seismic data to properties of rocks and sediments

A new analysis of seismic data from the InSight mission to Mars has revealed some surprises. The first: the top 300 meters of the subsurface beneath the InSight landing site near the Martian equator contains little to no ice. "We find that Mars' crust is weak and porous, the sediments are not well-cemented, and there's no ice or not much ice filling the pore spaces," said geophysicist Vashan Wright of the Scripps Institution of Oceanography at the University of California San Diego. Wright and co-authors published the U.S. National Science Foundation-supported analysis in Geophysical Research Letters.

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Limb-regenerating fire-god salamander central to wound repair quest

Credit: Getty images

Regenerating lost body parts is impossible for humans, but cracking the cellular code of salamanders could help to treat serious wounds.

Salamanders are remarkable creatures. If one of these amphibians loses a finger, it grows back. Furthermore, if you chop away a piece of heart or spinal cord, it will regenerate. Perhaps most impressively, they can even regrow a leg bitten off by a hungry predator.

One of the most famous salamander species is the axolotl (Ambystoma mexicanum), which is found in lakes near Mexico City.

The axolotl is a veritable Peter Pan of salamanders. Even the 30-centimetre-long reproductive adult retains features of its youthful phase throughout its lifecycle.

The prominent gills protruding from the back of its head are retained from the axolotl's larval phase. The fact that it never leaves the water throughout its life is unusual for an amphibian.

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