A Special Place for Blog Lovers with a Touch of Science!

Enjoy our special posts in the fields of Earth & Planetary Sciences (EPS Blog) and Social Sciences & Arts (SSA Blog)

A Special Place for Blog Lovers with a Touch of Science!

Blog of Social Sciences & Arts SSA blog gives you the opportunity to participate in discussions concerning the human spirit in all of its aspects and applications. The discourse crosses the imaginary border between Science and Art in order to obtain a new level of understanding the cultural phenomena. From Political Sciences, Economics and...

Blog of Social Sciences & Arts SSA blog gives you the opportunity to participate in discussions concerning the human spirit in all of its aspects and applications. The discourse crosses the imaginary border between Science and Art in order to obtain a new level of understanding the cultural phenomena. From Political Sciences, Economics and Psychology to Medieval & Renaissance Studies, Philosophy, Literature and Visual Art, here is the place to extend the scope of your own knowledge or to share your expert opinion.

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9 Thoughts by Ancient Philosophers Still Relevant Today

Credit: The School of Athens. Detail of a mural by Raphael painted for Pope Julius II - In the center Plato (Leonardo da Vinci) discourses with Aristotle. 1509. Raphael; Gettyimages

The wisdom of Ancient Greek and Rome

1. "No man ever steps in the same river twice, for it's not the same river and he's not the same man."
— Heraclitus

2. "Most powerful is he who has himself in his own power."
— Seneca

3. "The unexamined life is not worth living."
— Socrates

4. "The life of money-making is one undertaken under compulsion, and wealth is evidently not the good we are seeking; for it is merely useful and for the sake of something else."
— Aristotle
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Great art explained: The Raft of the Medusa

Credit: Jean Louis Théodore Géricault – The Raft of the Medusa (Museo Del Louvre, 1818-19); via Wikipedia

The unrecognized genius

Do you know which is the second most popular painting in the Louvre museum, second only to Mona Lina? If not, maybe you could guess the painter? Well, it's not Raphael, Caravaggio, Rembrandt, or Delacroix, neither is Titian, Dürer, or some modernist painter. It is a painter who was recognized posthumously and died at the early age of 32. It gets even more intriguing because the picture depicts a true story of a shipwreck, and was a scandalous piece of art at the time.

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How sleep builds relational memory

Credit: Gettyimages

Making connections requires brain circuits to be active and interact during sleep

Relational memory is the ability to remember arbitrary or indirect associations between objects, places, people or events -- such as names and faces.

Previous research has established that animal and human memory benefits from quality sleep. In a new U.S. National Science Foundation-supported study published in The Journal of Neuroscience, Maxim Bazhenov and Timothy Tadros of the University of California San Diego

School of Medicine developed a modeling approach that may explain the underlying mechanisms that strengthen or create new relational memories during sleep.

"This new computational research provides insights into the importance of sleep for the consolidation of memory," said NSF program director Jonathan Fritz.

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The latest project of Xavier Cortada

Credit: Cortada.com

Xavier Cortada's Public Art

Over the past three decades, Cortada has created art across six continents including more than one hundred and fifty (150) public artworks and dozens of collaborative murals and socially engaged projects. Cortada's work aims to address our relationship to place, to each other, and the natural world. He has developed innovative art solutions to public art-making that explore our ability to coexist with nature.

Cortada's site-specific public art range from free-standing and suspended sculpture, fountains, plazas, ceramic tile murals, mosaics, paintings, and large-scale digital works. His Florida public art commissions include works at Port Everglades, the Frost Art Museum, the Florida Turnpike, Florida Botanical Gardens, Curtis Park, and at ten Miami-Dade Housing Authority sites.

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Great Art Explained: Hieronymus Bosch

Credit: The Garden of Earthly Delights in the Museo del Prado in Madrid, c. 1495–1505, attributed to Bosch; via Wikipedia

The Garden of Earthly Delights

We could use tons of words to describe the work of Hieronymus Bosch but that won't be enough. His pictures are so full of various figures, allegories, and metaphors, more of which could be deciphered only through the imagination of the medieval mind. On the other hand, visual art is traditionally hard to be transcribed into words and is often ineffable. That is especially the case when we are talking about his most famous triptych – The Garden of Earthly Delights  (c.1503-1515) – that represents heaven, earth, and hell. Its obvious connections with Biblical texts give us some ideas about the possible meaning but that is definitely a small part of the massive scenes represented in the picture and fails to elucidate the surrealistic imagery and hallucinatory-like visions populating it.

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